2017 has been a unique year when it comes to the vehicles on offer in showrooms worldwide. Jeep has seemingly gone back to its heritage roots by offering an off-roading superstar that pays particular honor to its history of being a supplier of military vehicles. While it is still offered in Sport, Sport S, Sahara, and Rubicon models, the vehicle has seemingly lost its way when it comes to standard road driving as it's a generally rough experience with poor handling on the pavement. This doesn't necessarily mean prospective buyers should avoid one altogether though.

Exterior

It's true that Jeep vehicles are a bit of a head turner on the open road. There's really nothing that looks like them on the road and they're not exactly the most aerodynamic vehicles on the planet (really, we can't even begin to name something that lacks these properties even more in an affordable package). However, its roots are all there: the door hinges are exposed and allow drivers to take off the top and doors to create a convertible SUV. This may appeal to some, but the market for them is rather limited.

Interior

Jeep vehicles aren't exactly known to have luxury interiors, but the 2017 edition of the Wrangler has taken massive strides forward when it comes to its interior design. Long gone are the various chunks of reinforced plastic and these have been replaced with a more modern instrument panel that's made of soft-touch materials that are waterproof and shield the sensitive electronic components appropriately. This means the interior, like earlier models, can simply be hosed off after a muddy ride on the trail without fear of damaging anything inside of the vehicle. Few manufacturers are able to provide that sort of feature.

Under the Hood

The drive system of the Wrangler based on a sturdy recirculating-ball steer, which does allow for very sharp bends and cornering. However, those who aren't familiar with this sort of steering system will find that the very wide chassis lean that it's capable of producing is quite scary on the open road. Its harshness also makes pavement driving a bit of a chore and creates a generally bouncy ride when trying to get from point A to B. Its expected mileage isn't particularly noteworthy either at a rating of just 18 mpg combined. However, considering its military background, the Jeep is quite an economical option.

Price

The drive system of the Wrangler based on a sturdy recirculating-ball steer, which does allow for very sharp bends and cornering. However, those who aren't familiar with this sort of steering system will find that the very wide chassis lean that it's capable of producing is quite scary on the open road. Its harshness also makes pavement driving a bit of a chore and creates a generally bouncy ride when trying to get from point A to B. Its expected mileage isn't particularly noteworthy either at a rating of just 18 mpg combined. However, considering its military background, the Jeep is quite an economical option.

What can be hard when it comes to the vehicle's shape is finding something to protect it against the elements when it's not under rigorous use. This is best done by a precision-engineered car cover from www.carcover.com, which are backed by an industry leading guarantee.